TOP

<

>

PHOTOGRAPHER

Las Vegas, USA

ARTIST

Sao Paolo, Brazil

STUDENT

New York City, USA

PHOTOGRAPHER

Warsaw, Poland

ISSUE 29: May 2014
FEATURING
Photographer: Paul Turounet,  Artist: Felipe Yung,
Student: Pauline Miko  and Photographer: Boniecki Stanislaw.

Paul Turounet

Felipe Yung

Pauline Miko

Boniecki Stanislaw

WRITER

Danube River, Serbia

WEEED GROWER

Undisclosed, USA

PHOTOGRAPHER

Outside of Los Angeles, USA

PHOTOGRAPHER

Milan and Padua, Italy

ISSUE 28: March 2014
FEATURING
a writer sailing the Danube River,  a weed grower during harvest,
a fashion shoot outside Los Angeles,  a photographer in Milan and Padua

Shane Kennedy

Billie X

Samantha West

Alfred Agostinelli

musicians

San Francisco, USA

musicians

Los Angeles, USA

musicians

New York City, USA

musicians

Los Angeles, USA

ISSUE 27: February 2014
WARNER BROTHERS RECORDS
A special collaborative issue featuring:
The Flaming Lips, Skaters, Atlas Genius  and The Rubens

THE FLAMING LIPS

SKATERS

ATLAS GENIUS

THE RUBENS

UNEMPLOYED

Kibera, Kenya

FASHION DESIGNER

Kibera, Kenya

UNEMPLOYED

Kibera, Kenya

UNEMPLOYED

Kibera, Kenya

ISSUE 26: January 2014
THE KIBERA SLUMS
The Kibera slum is located in Nairobi, Kenya and is the largest slum in Africa. It is home to over a million people, who are all crowded into one square mile. Up to ten people will squeeze into one small room and the one million residents share 600 toilets. Without any sewage system or trash collection the streets are made of garbage and human waste. Everyday is a fight to survive for the people of Kibera. This issue focuses on four individuals who grew up and live in these slums

VICTOR GEORGE

JULIUS

JOASH

BENEDICT

PAUL TUROUNET

Photographer
Las Vegas, USA

Paul Turounet
“Before photography, I worked at Kentucky Fried Chicken, on the assembly line of a packaging manufacturer, as a bank courier, an ad agency assistant, a box loader for an air freight company, a bike messenger, a carpenter, and a blueprint courier, in that order.”
Art has its odd way of finding us, whether we resist, don't know that we're meant to create, or must follow a circuitous path to artistic expression as raison d'etre and support system.
For the past decade, Bay Area-bred San Diego resident Paul Turnouet has “ had the pleasure to work with students as a Professor of Art and Photography at Grossmont College.” A long road has led to passion providing not only subsistence and an outlet for expression, but also a conduit for sharing his love with a younger generation.
Paul once followed a certain kind of adventure, the sort that both feeds on creative urges and inspires new ways of thinking. “Since graduating with my MFA in photography from Yale in 1995, I was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship in 1997 and grants from the Trans-Border Institute in 2003 and 2004 for my work on the U.S.-Mexico border, which has been featured in various solo and group exhibitions in both the United States and Mexico.”
After years of travels, teaching, and thinking, Paul ended up in Las Vegas, documenting a city that exists as much as a testament to adventure and expense as any other.
“Making the photographs along the Strip and in the casinos, particularly Circus Circus, brought me back to the times of a family vacation in the 1970's and remember the trapeze women flying in the air under the big top and the sounds of the arcade games.”
For his journey through Las Vegas, Paul suggests you listen to Frank Sinatra’s rendition of “Luck Be A Lady.”
www.paulturounet.com

FELIPE YUNG

Artist
Sao Paolo, Brazil

Felipe Yung
“If you could follow one person (famous or not) around with your camera, who would it be and why?” “Zen monk calligraphist.”
For some artists, words fail to properly capture the character of their creation.
São Paulo native and world traveler Felipe Yung limits his words and lets his life speak:
“Multi Artist. Muralist. 20 years of Graffiti. Drawing since a little kid.”
Crystallizing an existence so defined by whimsy and a will to see the world in words is an endeavor that will often skirt around the edges, never capturing the essence.
His story unravels through meals and the moods of others, colors and shapes. It takes little form or direction, providing the feeling of pinballing presence attempting to document its bounces through the world.
If you need a soundtrack while looking at Felipe’s pictures, he suggests you listen to Clutchy Hopkins.

www.flipon.com.br

PAULINE MIKO

Student
New York City, USA

Pauline Miko
“We basically travelled from apartments to apartments of strangers, friends of friends for 10 days. We slept on floors, carpets, fancy beds, futons, in student dorms, in the studio of lesbian artists, in musician's apartment...”
Freedom is an inexorable force, a fearless, invisible guide that pulls its subject along a path that can often resemble bold intent or total insanity–sometimes both.
23-year-old Belgian photography student Pauline Mako runs on her own unborrowed time, a spirit seeking adventure and always carrying the tools to capture fleeting moments.
“These photos were shot in New York City, and more specifically in Staten Island where my best friend and I stayed for two days...We had no place to stay for the last two weeks of the month and no money to pay an hotel room so we posted a note on Facebook asking for help.”
Challenge and crisis forge beauty and narrative intrigue, the stuff not only of stories told in bars and to future generations, but also the stuff of memories to be seized in photographic amber.
“These photos were taken in the apartment of photographer Agnes Thor and Graham Tucker, editor at Folklore Magazine. Their apartment was the best place we got to stay at during our 'homeless episode'. There's also pictures of a walk Eva and I took in the city on that day.”
There is a charming contradiction in attempting to freeze a life lived with abandon, but whimsical irony seems par for Pauline’s course.
If you need a soundtrack while looking at Pauline’s photos, she suggests Daughter, TWIN, and, fittingly, Wild You
www.paulinemiko.com

BONIECKI STANISLAW

Photographer
Warsaw, Poland

Boniecki Stanislaw
“The best thing is always shooting. Thats it. I just love to take pics. With my iPhone, with my camera with whatever.”
Purity of existence in creation. While many artists seek some larger notion of truth in their work, some chase the thrill of making pure and simple in their daily pursuits.
Polish photographer Stanislaw “Bo” Boniecki photographs his world with this clarity of intention.
“I've been shooting pics since I remember. I started to work professionally as a photographer in 2008...I shoot all the time. I post pictures on my Tumblr and all those social networking websites.”
A love of capturing existence cuts through all editorial instincts and desires to critique the world. Those concerns may exist, but documentation and the joy it produces come first for a creator like Bo.
“ I just love to take pics. With my iPhone, with my camera with whatever. Whats cool about it is that I can create things.”
Though even the most reduced art finds its aims, Bo's works seems particularly stripped, the art of a man attempting to simply capture his world as best he can.
If you need a soundtrack while looking at Bo's photos, his suggestion is tentative: “maybe Madlib?”
www.cargocollective.com/bobrowiec

SHANE KENNEDY

Writer
Danube River, Serbia

Shane Kennedy
“You cannot assign a summer jam. It must reveal itself. The world must give it to you.”

As an artist of any stripe, it's necessary to absorb before you emit. Whether your mode of capture is the pen or the lens, creation requires the research of living.
Tennessee-born writer Shane Kennedy has spent the last two summers aboard the Hippo, a 36-foot junk-rig schooner built in Connecticut in 1980 that has since traveled the world–most recently braving the Black Sea and the Romanian coast.
“Being on a boat gives you unique access to many places that normal travelers will not usually see, and a way to connect with locals that seems impossible when backpacking. You get to skip the big city hustle and see the backside of a place. Every country with a coast has some form of boat culture, and boat people have an automatic kinship with their kind. You meet a lot of extremely gracious people. When people think of sailing, they think of the Mediterranean or the Bahamas and things like that, but the places people don’t think of as boat places are much more exciting to me. Like Iran for instance, which has lots of coast.”
Ship captain Clemens Poole has created of the Hippo a sort of floating artist commune, a mobile studio that also demands of its residents a certain physical toll.
“Aside from taking photos and video,” Shane says, “I have also served as the ship’s engineer for the last two years keeping the diesel engine in shape and repairing the boat’s wiring and electrical system.”
The ship provides a unique way of working, of seeing and filtering the world–particularly for a writer whose stories are largely “informed by the people and events that surround me.”
“While sailing, everyone took turns piloting, cooking, cleaning, and sunning. There was a little time for reading and leisure, but being on a small sailboat is physically and mentally demanding. We would find a place to dock near dusk and explore whatever town or village we were in, sometimes staying for a day or two.”
The combination of routine and ever-shifting setting create the perfect balance for a creator, mingling adventure with a rigidity that allows for digestion.
“Each day has the same structure, but all are completely different and exciting.”
If you need a soundtrack while looking at Shane's photos, you should let the Hippo guide you: “Each year a 'summer jam' usually presents itself. The summer jams are impossible to pick…you cannot assign a summer jam. It must reveal itself. The world must give it to you. This year, much to our amazement and eventual chagrin, Serbia gave us the parting gift of 'I Was Made for Loving You' by Kiss. Put it on repeat, point a fan at your face, spritz a little salt water in your hair, and you will be at least 75% of the way there.”
www.shanekandy.com/

BILLIE X

Weed Grower
Undisclosed, USA

Billie X
“Coffee and a simple breakfast is one of my most important daily rituals that helps balance the non routine elements of my life.”

At a time in the all too recent past, it might seem impossible to imagine an America in which the controlled sale of marijuana for any use–medicinal or recreational–could come to fruition. Long a societal specter threatening to rob our children of precious brain cells and initiative, the battle over the relative merits and hazards of of the herb has raged since Reefer Madness gave a post-prohibition nation a new enemy.
In 2014, Colorado and Washington have legalized the recreational pot use and national attitudes appear to be softening. As America's overall outlook on the use of a plant both celebrated and reviled shifts, one might imagine attitudes surrounding the infrastructure that produces it–not to mention the nature and legality of said infrastructure–to adjust accordingly.
For many marijuana growers, the freedom to pursue a passion and profession requires a delicate balance of public and private existence. The job demands secrecy, even as the country creeps towards acceptance (notwithstanding that legal barriers have begun to tumble).
Dispose had the privilege of peeking into the world of a marijuana grower. The pictures detail daily routines, beautiful nature, and a sophisticated operation. The grower's words reveal the difficulty of a life still on the outskirts of acceptance.
“It was challenging shooting this roll without including any of the people in my life that make it meaningful. My friends, lovers and family are a huge part of who I am and with them missing from the shoot for obvious reasons it feels like a big part of who I am is missing from the photos.”

SAMANTHA WEST

Photographer
Outside of Los Angeles, USA

Samantha West
“I hope that a sense of fun came through in the shots. I really believe in working hard but having fun in order to create great work.”

For many artists and creators who choose to pursue their passion as a living, the lines between work and downtime fast begin to blur. The life of a photographer, in particular, poses a difficult challenge: With so many moments to document and so many ways to document, which are worthy of focus?
Photographer Samantha West faced this conundrum in crafting her Dispose spread while on the assignment.
“My main focus was on the fashion shoot, but I also wanted to make sure I captured some moments for this project. I didn't want to lose an opportunity for the editorial shots and at the same time, I didn't want to miss out on a great moment that I could capture on the disposable camera.”
Like any modern photographer worth her salt, Samantha photographs obsessively.
“I am shooting with my iPhone all the time, all day, every day, I have 10s of 1000s of iphone photos. I really believe that a great eye is a great eye and it can be translated in a variety of ways. A good photo is not determined by how expensive your equipment is.”
Whether working on a shoot or walking the streets of her birthplace, Manhattan, her current home, Brooklyn, or her future home, Los Angeles, Samantha weaves photography into the fabric of every day–the only way to turn a labor of love into a viable life.
If you need a soundtrack to Samantha's photos, she recommends that you listen to Talking Heads' "Stop Making Sense," mixed in with Jagwar Ma's "Howlin." mixed in with Brian Eno's "Ambient 1:Music for Airports."
www.samanthawest.net/

ALFRED AGOSTINELLI

Photographer
Milan and Padua, Italy

Alfred Agostinelli
“I pretend to be a photographer, but I’m more inclined to be a bum.”

Some people have a seemingly uncanny knack for finding their way into the most intriguing situations. When the unusual is nowhere to be found, they manage to make sparks of the mundane.
Italian photographer Alfred Agostinelli seems to have been born for the very purpose of experiencing life as a set of remarkable circumstances.
“I come from a valley at the foot of the Alps, the kind of place where you can set Grimm’s fairy tales or where there’s still the risk a raging crowd chase you with torches and pitchforks if it turns out that you can read a book. I live now in an old synagogue not far from Venice.”
With a heart for adventure (Alfred's primary concerns while taking these photos: “to get through the day without dropping the camera in a puddle of water or falling from the roof of the cathedral myself.”) and a tendency towards “delirium and disruption,” it seems Venice resident repels the ordinary or otherwise molds it to his will.
While the shoot reflected some of his narrative designs alongside the pace and content of his daily existence, Alfred's ideal spread lies elsewhere, in Lofoten, Norway.
I lived there for a while and I think it’s a special place ‘cause of its subversive nature. A land without a sunset is a sublime act of anarchy. It gives you the feeling of abandoning the last bourgeois cliché: The alternation between day and night.”
If you need a soundtrack to Alfred's photos, he recommends that you listen to Laid Back's “Bakerman,” though he says his aesthetic mindset is closer to bands like Throbbing Gristle.
www.turingapple.tumblr.com/

THE FLAMING LIPS

Musicians
San Francisco, USA

The Flaming Lips
“We longed to have no control of our lives...”
Survival is reinvention. Adaptations can be small or major, the world of entertainment demands of artists “evolve, die, or prepare your Vegas residency and retirement tour.”
What to do when you're 30 years deep into a career that has generated 3 Grammy Awards, constant critical plaudits, a rabid, dedicated fanbase, and a fair share of head scratching, invigorating moments? If iconic psych-rock crusaders The Flaming Lips serve as a measuring stick, the answer is: Keep pushing, commit to the strange, the ethereal, the otherworldly, and let the spirits guide you in your quest for meaning.
“And so, maybe when we are immersed in chaos for too long, we long for stability or control. And maybe when we have control for too long, we have a desire for chaos. Or maybe we are just hungry worms…”
Lips band leader Wayne Coyne readily describes the band's latest album–aptly titled The Terror, words that loosely recall the dying gasps of another maverick, Colonel Kurtz in Apocalypse Now–as a “bleak, disturbing record,” born out of the singer's split from his partner of the last 25 years. The Terror is a new stage in the life of an aging, ever-inventive band, an exploration of the notion that “we know now, that even without love, life goes on…”
http://www.flaminglips.com/

SKATERS

musicians
Los Angeles, USA

Skaters
“Everyone's pretending that they're making it on their own...That's a big part of living in New York City.”
Once upon a time, a mythical land called New York City was packed with devil may care dreamers, artists, and musicians stuffed into the darkest, parent-frightening corners of the city, creating fringe visions. Uncertainty abounded for the dreamers. Would anyone listen? Would anyone care?
The resounding answer: Whatever. Just create.
New York quartet Skaters isn't the sort of rattling punk death machine that would terrify your parents into telling you to stay the hell away from the East Village and locking you into your room, but they do their best to embody the classic ethos that accompanied New York's legendary layers of grit and grime in the 60s and 70s.
Skaters polishes their punk roots with a pop sheen and the run off of eclectic influences–Zeppelin, Queen, Nirvana, 80s R&B, proto-hip-hop. Their sound is a love letter to a city and all its foibles, a vision of New York familiar to any New Yorker: Idolizing the city even as they poke fun at it.
Fitting, then, that their debut record–the aptly titled Manhattan–is a flirtation with the city where Skaters' vision cohered, mashing subway noises, bits of conversation, observations of hipsters and hustlers, fakers and honest folk. It may not revive the old New York, but it’s a reminder that in a city with this many pocket, you can always create the world you wish to live in.
http://www.skatersnyc.com/

Atlas Genius

musicians
New York City, USA

Atlas Genius
“We had begun to think that music was a pipedream and we had all gone back to university to pursue more realistic careers.”
From a distance, dreamers always look like mad men–at very least like children doing something ill-advised. Only after the dream finds fulfillment do the onlookers start to admit: “Maybe those guys saw something I didn't...Or maybe they're just crazy.”
When you write songs like that are Atlas Genius' stock-in-trade, it's hard to imagine anyone feeling the latter, though given their success in the past year it isn't difficult to imagine many lamenting that they didn't share the band's coy pop vision.
One song can change an entire career trajectory; inescapably catchy single “Trojans” played catalyst to Atlas Genius' decision to shun a return to school and march ahead full bore into a musical adventure that would pull them from a simple blog post to a single selling almost 350,000 copies–no small feat in hostile waters.
A lightness pervades the music of the Australia natives, a wordless acknowledgment of their grand adventure and the shimmering, smart pop music that sparked it.
http://atlasgenius.com/

The Rubens

musicians
Los Angeles, USA

The Rubens
“It was the coolest thing skating down Broadway and down through Times Square at one in the morning after we’d finished up a session.”
In the past decade, the internet has taken on a strange dual power. At once, it is the all-devouring void–a black hole repository where random YouTube videos, Soundcloud uploads, tweets, Facebook statuses, and Tumblr posts go to die–and the information railgun, capable of launching pieces of content into stratospheric, viral orbit–or, at very least, into the right hands.
After Australian quintet The Rubens recorded their first demo, “My Gun,” lead singer Sam Margin posted it online, expecting little more than a quiet reverberation in the void. Instead, it rattled its way into the hands of Grammy Award-winning producer David Kahne, jump-starting a journey that would push the band to the top of the Australian pop charts.
From internet ether, The Rubens have begun to leave their imprint on the world beyond the screen, hitting SXSW, Governor's Ball, and Bonnaroo, building a reputation as stellar live performers. A debut album on a major label marks the carrot atop their fairy tale for the digital age, a story still in its infancy.
http://www.therubensmusic.com

VICTOR GEORGE

Unemployed
Kibera, Kenya

Victor George
“POVERTY IS TEMPORARY KIBERA TALKING”
Like many residents of Kibera, Victor George has faced a life replete with tragic loss. A child of three, the 19 year-old's siblings were poisoned when he was young. He never knew his father and his mother, an alcoholic, has been largely unable to take care of him. Victor takes care of himself, keeping afloat by taking odd jobs around Kibera. While he finished primary school, he was never able to advance beyond it. Still, he is determined to make the most of each day, forging constantly onward.
Victor's unflappable will to survive serves as a reminder that even in dire circumstances–beset by personal turmoil, slim professional prospects, and a city built of refuse–a person with burning focus resists extinguishing.

JULIUS

Fashion Designer
Kibera, Kenya

Julius
“WE ARE 1 FAMILY KIBERA TALKING”
20 year-old Kibera native Julius works as a fashion designer, allowing him to support his three siblings and presently unemployed parents–both financially and as a source of inspiration.
In 2010, after finishing secondary school, Julius attended fashion school on a scholarship, giving him the training and platform to subsequently start his own company, Afrifashions. Starting with a rickey sewing machine, Julius has managed to establish a shop in Nairobi, giving him access to the city's markets.
Julius makes sure his family eats; he makes sure his little brother Flavian stays in school; he make sure his teenage sister Brenda's baby is taken care of. Julius is the family glue.

JOASH

Unemployed
Kibera, Kenya

Joash
Joash was born in Kibera and is now seventeen years old. For most of his life Joash lived with both of his parents. In 2007 they both died though. His mom died from lung cancer and then his dad died because he had high blood pressure a few months later. Joash is the youngest of five kids and now lives with his twenty-nine year old brother, Wilis.
Willis is a graphic designer and is married and has two kids. Willis’s wife, Beatrice, resents Joash greatly for living with them and so when Willis travels for work, which is often, she prevents him from going to school or the FaFu youth group. She gives him chores and makes him take care of her two year old. She sometimes hits him when she gets mad as well, but usually she just yells. He doesn’t want to tell Willis what goes on though because he doesn’t want to cause trouble and he is probably also scared of being cut off.

BENEDICT

Unemployed
Kibera, Kenya

Benedict
“POVERTY IS TEMPORARY KIBERA TALKING”
In his brief 17 years, Kibera resident Benedict has faced more hardship than most will experience in a lifetime. His father was murdered when Benedict was four years-old, his grandmother suspecting his mother as the culprit. The deaths of his mother, grandmother, and sister followed shortly, forcing Benedict to live with a disinterested aunt and uncle who often withheld meals from the young man and made it difficult for him to go to school. By 14, Benedict was a drug and alcohol-abusing gang member.
Against all expectation, Benedict smiles. Often.
Benedict recently finished the 8th home (extremely modest though it may be at 7 square feet). He finds great pride in taking care of it.
His achievements might seem small to those for whom education and home are givens, but Benedict's life is a beautiful triumph, a testament to perseverance through unfathomable ordeal.

We at Dispose distribute throwaway cameras to a wide range of people living across the world. We ask contributors to document one day in 27 exposures. From the time they wake up to the time they go to sleep, these individuals shoot a minimum of one photo per hour including one self portrait.

MORE TO EXPLORE

BROWSE BY COUNTRY

The Arctic

Joshua Holko

Australia

Sean Woodward

Bulgaria

Saša Arsić

Burma

Jonathan Hulland

Brazil

Felipe Yung

Canada

Dan C.
Chris Vanderwees

China

Archana Rayamajhi

Rwanda

Elizabeth Scharpf

Egypt

Eric Monkaba

England

Bradley Cowan

France

Jean Luc Juan
Monique Bertrand
Nick & Kate

Germany

Obi Blanche

Greece

Adrianna Glaviano

Indonesia

Dion Agius

India

Monica Dogra
Atul Ohri

Israel

Blake Shaw
Know Hope

Japan

Elli-Rose Van Cliff
Nico Perez
Archana Rayamajhi
Gui Martinez
Aoki Takamasa

Kazakhstan

Dulla Amin

Kenya

Victor George
Julius
Joash
Benedict

Dulla Amin

Lithuania

Vaida Mary Jane

Mexico

James Murphy

Palestine

Blake Shaw

Poland

Boniecki Stanislaw

Singapore

Magdalene Lim

South Africa

Know Hope

South Korea

Das Moth

Spain

Diego Exteberria
Ashley Sebok
Cassia Martinez de Carvalho
Hare Christian

Sweden

Adam Lindmark
Kalle Lindmark

Taiwan

Cris Stringfellow

USA (East)

Pat Jarrett
Pauline Miko
Tyler Scaife
Sam Williams
Gwen Smith
Atlas Genius
Thomas Hemerick
Gabriella Maria Serra
Nick Bloom-Scaglione
Justin Miller
Monica Lopez de Victoria
Gloria Chung
Dustin Yellin
Gabriel Florenz
Deantoni Parks
Curtis Kulig
Mr. Henry X
Debbie Attias
Sascha Lewis
Anthony Dargenzio

USA (Mid-west)

Alec Soth
Allysa Pusecker

USA (West)

Cassie Venaglia
The Flaming Lips
The Rubens
Skaters
Ingrid Sophie
Hassan Rahim
Douglas Lyle-Thompson
Paul Turounet
Kassia Meador
DJ Harvey
Maia Fromme

Venezuela

Anabell Ruiz
Lora Franco

FACEBOOK

TUMBLR